2020 CDOR Events Schedule

2020 CDOR SCHEDULE OF VIRTUAL EVENTS:

10/26 (Mon) - 10/30 (Fri) and 11/7 (Sat) - 11/8 (Sun)

Accessible Version of the FULL PROGRAM, Click Here
PDF version with Photos of the FULL PROGRAM, Click Here 

Special Events:

Oct. 26 (Mon) 2pm  Lawrence Ross

Lawrence Ross has written a total of seven books on the African American experience, including Blackballed: The Black & White Politics of Race on America’s Campuses . Blackballed explores the present and historical issues of racism on hundreds of American college campuses, and how that ties into today’s #BlackLivesMatter campaign.  

Oct. 27 (Tue) 5pm  Dr. Bettina Love

Dr. Bettina Love is an award-winning author and Associate Professor of Educational Theory & Practice at the University of Georgia. She is one of the field’s most esteemed educational researchers in the areas of how anti-blackness operates in schools, Hip Hop education, and urban education. Her work is also concerned with how teachers and schools working with parents and communities can build communal, civically engaged schools rooted in intersectional social justice for the goal of equitable classrooms.  

Nov. 7 (Sat) 11am Claudia Rankine "JUST US" Book Talk

Nov. 7 (Sat) 2pm  Claudia Rankine CDOR Keynote  

Claudia Rankine is the author of award-winning book Citizen: An American Lyric. In 2016, Rankine was awarded a MacArthur "Genius" Grant and named a United States Artists Zell fellow in literature. In 2017, she founded the Racial Imaginary Institute, a "a moving collaboration with other collectives, spaces, artists, and organizations towards art exhibitions, readings, dialogues, lectures, performances, and screenings that engage the subject of race." She is currently a Frederick Iseman Professor of Poetry at Yale University.

Nov. 8 (Sun) 2nd Annual First Generation College Celebration, TBA

 

 

CDOR Program Page 2

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CDOR Program page 3

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CDOR Program page 4

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ALL EVENTS ARE FREE AND OPEN TO PUBLIC

For Complete Events Schedule: 

https://dialogue.humboldt.edu/events-calendar 

Community guidelines for CDOR

Respect and honor people’s experiences
Be open to learning and unlearning 
Share from experience using “I” statements”

Land Acknowledgement:

Humboldt State University is located on the present and ancestral Homeland and unceded territory of the Wiyot Tribe. Please donate to the Wiyot Tribe honor tax. We encourage direct giving to Tribes and Native-led efforts. Tribes and Nations in Humboldt County include Hupa, Karuk, Mattole, Tolowa, Wailaki, Wiyot, Yurok. We make this land acknowledgement in recognition that our words must be matched by action and approach. Please learn from Dr. Cutcha Risling Baldy's lecture "What Good Is a Land Acknowledgment?"

For links to land acknowledgment go to: https://dialogue.humboldt.edu/dialogue-events

 

Labor Acknowledgement:

Today we recognize and acknowledge the labor upon which our country, state, and institutions are built. Remember that our country is built on the labor of enslaved people who were kidnapped and brought to the US from the African Continent and recognize the continued contribution of their survivors. We acknowledge all immigrant labor, including voluntary, involuntary, and trafficked peoples who continue to serve within our labor force

  • NO ASSUMPTIONS — EXCEPT FOR BEST INTENTIONS.

    • People should not assume other people’s experiences or anything else. The only assumption people should make is that when other participants speak, they are speaking with the best intentions and do not mean to offend anyone.

  • CORRECT GENTLY, BUT DO CORRECT.

    • If participants say something that is incorrect or offensive, politely address what was said. Letting comments slip by only makes the space less safe and increases the difficulty of building successful partnerships.

  • DON’T “YUCK MY YUM.”

    • When group members share their likes and dislikes, respect their personal opinions and preferences.

  • USE “I” STATEMENTS.

    • Everyone should speak from his/her/hir/their own experiences.

  • AVOID MAKING GENERALIZATIONS.

    • Don’t make blanket statements about any groups of people. (In addition to members of the LGBTQ community, this also includes political parties, religious groups, socioeconomic classes, age ranges, etc.) If you’re not sure that something you want to say is factually correct, phrase it as a question.

  • ONE MIC, ONE VOICE.

    • Only one person should speak at a time.

  • MAKE SPACE, TAKE SPACE.

    • Participants should be aware of how much they are speaking. If they feel they are speaking a lot, they should let others speak, and if they find themselves not talking, they should try to contribute some comments, ideas or suggestions.

  • RESPECT CONFIDENTIALITY.

    • Assume that stories and comments shared at meetings/workshops should remain private. Ask for consent before you share someone’s story or comment.

  • LEAN INTO DISCOMFORT.

    • Meetings and topics can sometimes be challenging. Be willing to experience some discomfort in discussions, and learn from it as a community!

  • PERSONALIZE THESE AGREEMENTS!

    • This is a placeholder for us if we would like to add anything.