2019 CDOR Events Schedule

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*PARKING & METER REGULATIONS ARE IN EFFECT UNTIL 10PM, MON-THU, AND 5PM ON FRI. PLEASE MAKE SURE TO PURCHASE A PARKING PERMIT OR BRING CHANGE FOR THE METERS!

2019 CDOR SCHEDULE OF EVENTS: 11/4 (M) – 11/8 (F) 

FREE AND OPEN TO PUBLIC

 

FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 1

SPECIAL EVENT

EQUITY SUMMIT 2019

8:30am – 4:00pm, Sequoia Conference Center

*$75 fee includes lunch and materials.  Registration required at my.hcoe.net Course #9010

Humboldt County Office of Education, Loleta Union Elementary, and Northwest Circle presents a day dedicated to cultural humility training for educators and local community members.  Community engagement addressing: Local/Tribal Perspectives, Social Justice in Education, Implicit Bias, Latinx, Special Education Inclusion, Racial Equity, LGBTQ, Supporting Immigrant Families and Microaggressions.

 

SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 2

 

CULTURAL HUMILITY WORKSHOP

9:00am – 1:00pm., Senior Dining Room, Arcata Community Center 

In partnership with the Office of Diversity, Equity and Inclusion (ODEI) at HSU, Humboldt Mediation Services invites you to participate at no cost in a session on Cultural Humility.  Introduced in 1988 by Drs. Melanie Tervalon and Jann Murray-Garcia, the cultural humility framework transformed cross-cultural education into a model derived from four basic principles: 1) critical self-reflection and lifelong learning, 2) recognition and mitigation of inherent power imbalances, 3) mutually beneficial non-paternalistic relationships with community members, highlighting the expertise that resides in the community, away from the university, agency, or clinic campus, 4) institutional accountability and alignment.

     You can register:  https://www.humboldtmediationservices.org/event-3573402 

     People who register will receive breakfast snacks and lunch.  Registration is FREE.

 

ARCATA INTERFAITH GOSPEL CHOIR HARVEST EVENT: CELEBRATING BLACK CULTURAL AWARENESS

7pm, Arcata Presbyterian Church, 11th & G Streets

Featuring AIGC Teen and Youth Choirs, No Wahala Body, Galilee Baptist Church Eureka, Eureka Seventh-day Adventist Church, Redwood Teen Challenge Choir.

MC: Douglas Smith

General $15, Students/Seniors $12, Kids 5 and under FREE     Refreshments Served

Tickets available at Wildberries, The Works and at the door or online at AIGCFALL2019.BrownPaperTickets.com

 

MONDAY, November 4 

WORKSHOP

INTRO TO RACE AND SOCIAL JUSTICE

9:00 – 10:30am, Goodwin Forum (Nelson Hall East 102)

An introduction for people unfamiliar with social justice themes and the role of race, ethnicity and privilege in our everyday identities.

PRESENTER: Monique Desir, Black Humboldt

 

WORKSHOP

CULTURAL APPROPRIATION VS. APPRECIATION

11:00am – 12:30pm, Goodwin Forum (Nelson Hall East 102)

This workshop highlights and distinguishes the practices of cultural appropriation and appreciation. In this workshop, we hope to create dialog and have the audience leave with a new understanding of the two terms. And the disproportionate effects they have on marginalized communities and identities.

PRESENTERS:  Student for Quality Education, Women’s Resource Center, & MultiCultural Center

 

WORKSHOP 

WRITE THE WORLD YOU WANT

1:00 – 2:30pm, Goodwin Forum (Nelson Hall East 102)

We live in scary times where those in power are trying to write our future into extinction. We have the collective power to write ourselves into a new more equitable future. Come create a zine or another written piece and share what your version of the world looks like in the future.

PRESENTERS:  Erika Andrews, Theressa Lopez, Alec Cox, Toyon Literary Magazine

 

WORKSHOP

WORDLESS STORIES

3:00 – 4:30pm, Library Room 114

Symptoms of trauma and oppression are metabolized and stored in the body. This Somatics and movement workshop offers tools for healing through embodying ourselves, and inhabiting our working and living spaces.

PRESENTER: Laura Muñoz, The Arcata Playhouse 

 

WORKSHOP 

AMERICAN NATIONALISM AS A TOOL OF SETTLER-COLONIALISM

3:00  - 4:20pm, Library Fishbowl (Room 209)

The role the US education system plays in reinforcing colonial structures in the country is well documented. Myths, such as the Doctrine of Discovery, the Second Amendment, objectivity and neutrality, multiculturalism, post-Civil Rights progressivism, etc. underpin hegemonic ideologies that sustain the United States dominance as a settler-colonial state. They thus become, in the education system, fundamental to American ‘proper citizenship,’ ‘patriotism,’ and American nationalism. As students of the US education system, it is our responsibility to deconstruct myths we have been socialized to perceive as ‘truth’ and ‘facts.’ In this workshop, we will deconstruct the myths listed previously by revisiting these conventional “truths” of US history and analyzing them through a settler-colonial framework.

 PRESENTER:  Maya Habis

 

SPECIAL PRESENTATION

LANGUAGE IN THE TRANSPORTATION AND LOCALIZATION INDUSTRY

3:00 - 5:00pm, Founders Hall 111

Zak Haitkin, HSU Alum, Project Manager at Lyft, will present.  This event is hosted by the World Languages & Cultures Dept. at HSU.

 

WORKSHOP

THRIVING OR SURVIVING: A DISCUSSION ON STUDENTS-OF-COLOR in PWIs

5:00 – 6:30pm, Library Fishbowl (Room 209)

This is a space for students of color at HSU to come together and discuss their experiences in the Predominantly-White Institution that is academia. Share strategies of survival, stories of triumph, and everything in between.

PRESENTER:  Dr. Andrea Delgado, Assistant Professor, English Dept.

 

WORKSHOP

BECOMING RESPONSIVE: WHITE RESPONSIBILITY TOWARD ANTI-RACIST ACTION

7:00 – 9:00pm, Library Fishbowl (Room 209)

As white people, it is our responsibility to not only be nonracist, but it is our responsibility to be actively anti-racist. As white folks we reap the passive and active benefits of white supremacy. Using our areas of privilege, let's begin (and continue) dismantling systems of oppression - which we often unknowingly, actively take part in. Toward our collective liberation!

PRESENTER:  Lasara Firefox Allen, Social Work

 

TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 5

WORKSHOP

CRITICAL MUSLIM STUDIES: AN OVERVIEW

9:00 – 10:30am, Goodwin Forum (Nelson Hall East 102)

This workshop will provide an overview of Critical Muslim Studies and ways in which HSU could improve its understanding of Islam and Muslims.

PRESENTER:  César G. Abarca, Associate Professor, Social Work

 

WORKSHOP

STUDENT OF COLOR STUDY ABROAD PANEL

11:00am – 12:00pm, Goodwin Forum (Nelson Hall East 102)

 This panel will consist of current and former students of color that have studied abroad through Humboldt State University. Students will be given the opportunity to ask the panel questions about their experiences, including how they dealt with identity while abroad.

PRESENTERS:  Doug Smith, Ava Mark, Isabel Beer, Cherise Figueroa, Caroline Mora, Miyako Namba, & Rabia Yalcin

 

WORKSHOP

TOWARD KULEANA (RESPONSIBILITY): DECOLONIZING HAWAII AND THE STRUGGLE FOR HAWAIIAN SOVEREIGNTY

11:00 – 12:30pm, Library Fishbowl (Room 209)

Modern Hawai'i, like its colonial overlord, the United States of America, is a settler society. The Hawaiian people, now but a remnant of the nearly one million Natives present at contact with the West in the 18th century, live at the margins of our island society. Less than 20% of the current population in Hawai'i, the Native Hawaiian people have suffered all the familiar horrors of contact: massive depopulation, landlessness, christianization, economic and political marginalization, institutionalization in the military and the prisons, poor health and educational profiles, increasing diaspora.

 PRESENTERS:  The Asian Desi Pacific Islander Collective and the HSU Native Hawaiians Club. Staff members: Puanani Faleofa from Extended Opportunity Programs and Services (EOPS)

 

KEYNOTE

ISLAMOPHOBIC NATIONALISM IN THE U.S. RACIAL LANDSCAPE

Dr. Nazia Kazi

5:00 – 6:30pm, Kate Buchanan Room

Dr. Nazia Kazi is an ethnographer and educator based in Philadelphia. Her work explores the role of Islamophobia and racism in the context of global politics. She has lived in Dubai, New York City, and the Chicagoland area. She is Assistant Professor of Anthropology at Stockton University in New Jersey, where she teaches courses on race, ethnicity, immigration, and Islam in the U.S. She is the author of Islamophobia, Race, and Global Politics, out now from Rowman & Littlefield.

 

WORKSHOP

DECONSTRUCTING SETTLER COLONIAL LAW AND POLICY

7:00 – 8:30pm, Kate Buchanan Room

Why does racism linger? Why is it so difficult to “let go” of past wrongs and just move forward? Part of the answer can be found in actively applied national and international legal theories that institutionalize racist settler-colonial policies. Participants will analyze and deconstruct several fundamental laws and discuss approaches to dismantle racist policies.

PRESENTER:  Cynthia Boshell

 

WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 6

WORKSHOP

COMMUNALIDAD AS A DECOLONIAL FRAME

9:00 – 10:00am, Goodwin Forum (Nelson Hall East 102)

Communalidad as a Learning standpoint is pivotal to the decolonial process in which we re-frame what teaching, and learning mean. How do we create change making and healing spaces of learning where we, share, and de/construct knowledge together?

PRESENTER:  Marisol Ruiz, Associate Professor, School of Education

 

WORKSHOP

RACIAL PALESTINIANIZATION AND EDUCATION UNDER OCCUPATION

11:00am – 1:00pm, Goodwin Forum (NHE 102)

Janet Winston will discuss her recent trip to Palestine/Israel to meet with Palestinian students,

professors, and human rights activists. Her presentation will focus on access to higher education in the Occupied Palestinian Territory. She will discuss the concept of “Racial Palestinianization” and its role in university life in the West Bank. The talk will highlight stories of creativity and resistance and conclude with ideas for how people in the U.S. can access resources for self-education and activism.

PRESENTER:  Dr. Janet Winston, Professor, English Dept.

 

WORKSHOP

BE SEEN AND HEARD:  THE INCLUSION OF ASIAN AMERICANS AND PACIFIC ISLANDER STUDENTS IN HIGHER EDUCATION – ASSERTION OF OUR COMMUNITIES FOR GREATER EQUITY AND SUCCESS

3:00 – 4:30pm, Library Fishbowl (Room 209)\ 

Although the US has made progress in raising awareness of mental health and normalizing conversations about the topic, a great deal of stigma remains around mental illness and poor mental health, and many still face barriers to accessing services and supports. Among Asian American and Pacific Islander (AAPI) communities, these issues are often shrouded by silence and shame, allowing misconceptions and minimization of mental health concerns to thrive. But AAPIs are not a monolith. Our understanding of their mental health needs—and how we respond—should reflect the diversity of experiences within the AAPI community.

PRESENTERS:  Student Presenters: Tammy Phrakonkham, Erdinel Mangubat, & Kawai Navares from The Asian Desi Pacific Islander Collective. Community Member: Tai Parker, Trans Health Case Manager - Open Door Community Health Center

 

FILM SCREENING & DISCUSSION

BLINDSPOTTING

5:00 – 7:30pm, Kate Buchanan Room  

Join us for a screening and discussion of the acclaimed film BLINDSPOTTING, written by and starring Oakland locals Daveed Diggs and Rafael Casal.  This multilayered and gripping film addresses criminalization, police violence, gentrification, cultural appropriation, family, and friendship. Discussion facilitated by Doug Smith, Coordinator of the African American Center for Academic Excellence.

Presenter: Doug Smith, Coordinator, African American Center for Academic Excellence

 

WORKSHOP

IT’S TIME TO MIX IT UP

7:00 – 9:00pm, Library Fishbowl (Room 209)

Listening to understand the depth of the black self, exploring mixed families’ relationships and mixed people as the future of America. Looking at who is in the spotlight and the historical legacy of loyalty and betrayal.

PRESENTERS:  indiana murillo, student, psychology

 

THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 7

WORKSHOP

WHAT HAPPENED TO THAT ETHNIC STUDIES BILL?

3:30 – 5:00pm, Library Fishbowl (Room 209)

If you are wondering about that Ethnic Studies Bill then come to this workshop to find out.  AB 2016 calls for the implementation of Ethnic Studies in all public schools.  This would make CA the first state to mandates all of public school students to take an Ethnic Studies course before they graduate high school. For many this has been a long awaited victory.  However, the bill is on hold.  What is the controversy over Ethnic Studies? In this workshop you will learn why this bill is being stalled and what you can do to help push it forward.

PRESENTERS:  Marisol Ruiz Gonzalez, Deema Hindawi, Jennifer Martinez, Alexandro Ochoa, Jose Cabello and Jonathan Peña

 

WORKSHOP

El Leñador: STUDENT JOURNALISM, TRANSPARENCY, AND SOCIAL JUSTICE

4:00 – 5:00pm, Goodwin Forum (Nelson Hall East 102)

El Leñador is the award-winning English and Spanish HSU student newspaper. We cover news, stories and experiences of diverse communities at HSU and in Humboldt County. We want to tell you about what we do and why news matters. We also want to hear from you and get story ideas about what you think is important.

PRESENTERS:  Vanessa Flores, Carlos Holguin, Isabel Beer, Jose Herrera, & Silvia Alfonso

 

FEATURED SPEAKER PRESENTATION

MARVEL-OUS TIMES ON CAMPUS: RACE(BENDING), WHITEWASHING, AND REPRESENTATION

Dr. John Johnson

5:00 – 6:30pm, Kate Buchanan Room

Dr. John Johnson is the Director of the Centers for Diversity and Inclusion at California State University, Sacramento. An accomplished scholar, Dr. Johnson earned a PhD in Social Psychology from the University of California, Santa Cruz and was a fellow with the University of California All-Campus Consortium for Research in Diversity. Dr. Johnson previously worked at Humboldt State University, where he was the founding coordinator of the African American Center for Academic Excellence and Staff-in-Residence.

 

LET’S TALK ABOUT THE MIDDLE EAST FILM SERIES AND DISCUSSION

THE ROOFTOPS (ALGERIA, 2013)

5:30 – 8:00pm, The Miniplex at Richard’ Goat, 401 “I” Street, Arcata

Five independent stories are told from the rooftops of Algiers, each in a different neighborhood of the city, paced by the daily calls to prayer.  This film examines the entanglement of class, gender, and politics in Algeria.  This event at The Miniplex is free and open to the public and is ADA accessible.  This project was made possible with support from the College of Arts, Humanities, and Social Sciences at HSU.

PRESENTER:   Dr. Leena Dallasheh, Professor, History Dept.

 

FILM SCREENING & DISCUSSION

INCIDENT AT OGLALA (THE LEONARD PELTIER STORY)

7:00 – 9:00pm, Goodwin Forum (Nelson Hall East 102)

Who is Leonard Peltier and why does he matter? In this workshop participants will learn about Native American activist, involved with the American Indian Movement (AIM) and political prisoner Leonard Peltier who has been imprisoned by the United States for over 40 years. Join local activists in discussing this topic and learn how to get involved in Free Leonard Peltier campaign.

PRESENTER:  Nathaniel McGuigan and Raini Kellogg (Party for Socialism and Liberation)

 

WORKSHOP

SO YOU WANT TO TEACH

7:00 – 9:00pm, Jolly Giant Recreation Room

An opportunity to explore the role teaching plays in social justice movements and to learn about the 13 Ways to become a teacher with disciplinary faculty and student support representatives. The Student California Teachers Association will provide tacos and raffle prizes while available speakers and workshop leaders from the Dialogue on Race, will be invited for a meet and greet event.

PRESENTERS:  School of Education faculty/staff, Promotoras Group, SCTA, faculty from teacher preparation pathways

 

 

FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 8

CANCELLED:  FEATURED SPEAKER PRESENTATION

How Can a University Be Antiracist and Address White Supremacy?

Dr. Asao Inoue

10:00 – 11:30am, Kate Buchanan Room

 Asao B. Inoue is Professor and Associate Dean of the College of Integrative Sciences and Arts at Arizona State University. He is the 2019 Chair of the Conference on College Composition and Communication. He has been a past member of the CCCC Executive Committee, and the Executive Board of the Council of Writing Program Administrators. Among his many articles and chapters on writing assessment, race, and racism, his article, “Theorizing Failure in U.S. Writing Assessments” in Research in the Teaching of English, won the 2014 CWPA Outstanding Scholarship Award.

 

SPECIAL EVENT

FIRST GENERATION COLLEGE CELEBRATION

12:00 – 3:00pm, Kate Buchanan Room

Join us as we celebrate and recognize past and present First Generation college students and graduates*.  Activities include building a First Gen profile for our virtual community, making First Gen. SWAG, connecting with campus resources, and listening and share out sessions where you will hear first-hand experiences and accomplishments of the First Generation community. Light refreshments will be provided.

*First Generation College students include individuals whose parents/guardians did not attain a bachelor’s degree.

PRESENTERS: TRiO Upward Bound, Educational Opportunity Program (EOP)/TRiO Student Support Services

 

WORKSHOP

RACE AND RESISTANCE: WRITING CHILDREN’S STORIES

12:00 – 1:30pm, Library Fishbowl (Room 209)

Creative writing and telling stories is an effective tool in dismantling white supremacy and racism. We will teach participates how to turn their racial experiences into powerful children's stories. Our hope is to continue to work with writers to publish with HSU press.

PRESENTERS:  Leslie Vasquez, Latierra Randle, Dr. Ramona Bell, Associate Professor,CRGS

 

CANCELLED:   FEATURED SPEAKER FACULTY WORKSHOP
Labor-Based Grading Contracts as Anti-Racist Classroom Assessment

Dr. Asao Inoue

2:00 – 4:00pm, Fishbowl

This interactive workshop gives participants a hands-on experience with labor-based grading contracts, which can be used in a wide range of courses across all disciplines. The grading practice takes all grades out of the classroom on a day to day basis, yet still produces a final course grade. Among many benefits to students, labor-based grading contracts encourage a critical space for students to interrogate judgement itself, take lots of risks in their learning, experience “failure” without being overly-punished by it, and cultivate critical, reflective stances toward the politics of language in the world. Participants of the workshop will get a number of resources: a sample labor-based grading contract, sample labor log for students, and a handout with other electronic resources for teachers who wish to explore this practice in their own classrooms. 

Sponsors:  Composition program (the first-year writing program), DHSI: Education, CDOR

 

WORKSHOP

POWER OF YOUR STORY

4:00 – 5:30pm, Library Fishbowl (Room 209) 

This workshop will be offered in Spanish and English.

Participants will create a 1-minute digital story of moments in their lives where they felt powerful and powerless. Participants will need to bring their phone.  We will use a video editing app to create, record, and edit our story.  We will have 2 additional devices onsite for participants as needed.

PRESENTERS:  Jackie Dandeneau, Laura Muñoz, Valeria Bañuelos, Eli Baum,

                           The Arcata Playhouse

 

DIA DE LOS MUERTOS

5:00pm - 8:00pm,  Goodwin Forum (Nelson Hall East 102)

El Centro presents DIA DE LOS MUERTOS featuring film screening of SELENA, Danza Azteca, Folklorico, Mariachi, and food.

 

WORKSHOP

GRIEVING WITHIN A COLORED IDENTITY

6:00 - 7:30pm, Library Fishbowl (Room 209)

Grieving Within A Colored Identity - outlines the intense need for guidance among students of color and how they cope with reoccurring accidents and situations that end in the life of a POC being ultimately lost. This workshop focuses on anti-internalization, self-concept, and healthy coping mechanisms before and after the trauma of the event or time occurs.

PRESENTERS:  Jayden Yarbrough, Brea Pratt, & Patrick Mcgown